FLORIDA-FRIENDLY LANDSCAPINGTM

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The UF/IFAS Extension Florida-Friendly Landscaping™ (FFL) Program is here to provide Polk County residents with information to help protect our natural resources. Practicing the nine principles of FFL reduces your need for water, fertilizers, and pesticides, all while creating and maintaining a beautiful landscape.

Our water resources are important with over 554 lakes in Polk County. Florida-Friendly Landscaping™ aims to reduce runoff and filter pollutants to help preserve and maintain healthy bodies of water, whether natural or manmade. By including the nine principles of FFL in the landscape, we are able to conserve water, create habitats for wildlife, and reduce pollution.

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RECENT FLORIDA-FRIENDLY LANDSCAPING BLOG POSTS

What to plant in February

February What to Plant Annuals/Bedding plants: Plants that can take a chill include dianthus, pansy, viola, and dusty miller. See Annualshttp://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/topic_annual_landscape_plants Bulbs: Try dahlia, crinum, and agapanthus. Provide adequate water for establishment and protect them from cold with mulch. See Bulbs for Florida
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2018 Highlands County Agricultural Tours

Highlands County Agricultural Tour Tickets are now ON SALE! Tickets for our Southern Highlands County Tour taking place on Wednesday, January 24th, 2018 are available! Dates/Times: Wednesday, January 24, 2018 - Northern Highlands County Agricultural Tour - 7:45am - 4:00pm Planned stops: Crews Ranch Avon Park Correctional Institute Horticulture Program

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A Mahonia for the Winter Garden

Many gardens in Escambia County are showing the signs of cold damage but there are plants that are adapted to seasonal changes in weather. The 'Marvel' Mahonia is an attractive evergreen that is actually blooming now. If temps were warmer bees would certainly be visiting flowers. Berries will follow that are attractive to birds. This is a great evergreen for shady locations. Plants will grow to about 6 feet in height with a spread of 3

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